Posts for: August, 2014

By Abercorn Family Dentistry
August 29, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants  
FrequentlyAskedQuestionsaboutFixedDentures

Q: Is there much of a difference between fixed and removable dentures?
A: There’s a BIG difference! Removable dentures are the type your grandparents might have had — and possibly their grandparents, too. They work well enough after you get used to them, but there’s always the issue of slippage, poor fit, limited function… and potential embarrassment. Modern fixed dentures, however, get their stability from today’s state-of-the-art system for tooth replacement: dental implants. They won’t loosen or slip, they function and “feel” like your own natural teeth, and they can last for years and years to come.

Q: How are fixed dentures supported?
A: Each arch (set of teeth comprising the top or bottom jaw) of a fixed denture is anchored into the jaw bone by four or more dental implants. These small screw-like devices, made of titanium metal, are placed into the jawbone in a minor surgical procedure. Once set in place, they remain permanently attached by both mechanical forces and osseointegration — the process in which living bone cells actually become fused with the metal implants themselves.

Q: What is the procedure for getting dental implants like?
A: Before having any work done, you will receive a thorough examination and have a set of diagnostic images made. Implant surgery is normally performed in the dental office, using local anesthesia or conscious sedation. If any failing teeth must be extracted (removed), that will be done first. Next, small openings are made in the gums and the jawbone, and the implants are placed in precise locations. Sometimes, a set of temporary teeth can be attached to the implants immediately; other times, the implants will be allowed to heal for a period of time.

Q: Besides added stability, are there other advantages to fixed dentures?
A: Yes! As they become integrated in the jaw, dental implants actually help preserve the quantity and quality of bone in the jaw; removable dentures, on the other hand, decrease bone quantity and quality. This is important because the jawbone plays a vital role in supporting facial features like lips and cheeks. When the facial features lose support, it can make a person look prematurely aged. Also, people who wear removable dentures often have trouble eating “challenging” foods like raw fruits and vegetables (which are highly nutritious), and opt for softer, more processed (and less nutritious) foods. With fixed dentures, however, you can eat the foods you like.

Q: Aren't fixed dentures with dental implants more expensive?
A: Initially, the answer is yes — but in the long run, they may not be. Unlike removable dentures, which inevitably need to be re-lined or remade as the jawbone shrinks, fixed dentures can last for the rest of your life. They don’t require adhesives or creams, and you will never have to take them out at night and clean them. In fact, you can think of them as a long-term investment in yourself that pays off with a better quality of life!

If you’d like more information on fixed dentures, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implants: Your Best Option for Replacing Missing Teeth.”


By Abercorn Family Dentistry
August 14, 2014
Category: Oral Health
AWake-UpCallinMajorLeagueBaseball

What would it take to get you to give up tobacco? For major league baseball player Addison Reed, it took the death of his former coach, Tony Gwynn. Gwynn, a Hall-of-Famer who played for the San Diego Padres in addition to coaching at San Diego State, was just 54 years old when he died of oral cancer. As soon as Reed heard the sad news, the Arizona Diamondbacks’ relief pitcher says he knew what he needed to do: He took every can of smokeless tobacco he owned and dumped them all in the trash.

“It’s just become a habit, a really bad habit,” Reed told an interviewer at MLB.com. “It was something I always told myself I would quit.” But quitting took him many years — in fact, Reed admitted that he first started using smokeless tobacco as a junior in high school.

People begin using tobacco — in the form of cigarettes, cigars, pipes, or smokeless types (snuff, chewing tobacco, or dip) — for a variety of reasons. One major draw is that they see others doing it. And, while smoking is prohibited in most all Major League venues, the use of smokeless tobacco has remained fairly widespread.

Smokeless tobacco isn’t a safe alternative to cigarettes. According to the National Cancer Institute, it contains 28 carcinogenic agents. It increases the risk not only for oral and pancreatic cancer, but also for heart disease, gum disease, and many other oral problems. It’s also addictive, containing anywhere from 3.4 to 39.7 milligrams of nicotine per gram of tobacco — and its use has been on the rise among young adults.

But now the tide may be turning. After Addison Reed’s announcement, his former college teammate Stephen Strasburg (now a pitcher for the Washington Nationals) resolved that he, too, would give up tobacco. “[The] bottom line is, I want to be around for my family,” said Strasburg. Mets left-hander Josh Edgin has vowed to try quitting as well. It’s even possible that Major League Baseball will further restrict the use of smokeless tobacco at games.

What does this mean for you? It may just be the opportunity you’ve been waiting for… to stop using tobacco. Dentists have seen how quickly oral cancer can do its devastating work — and we can help you when you’re ready to quit. The next time you come in for a checkup, ask us how. Your teeth and gums will thank you — and your family will too.


By Abercorn Family Dentistry
August 01, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: floss   oral health   oral hygiene  
NewOrleansClaimtoDentalInvention

Think of New Orleans, Louisiana, and what comes to mind? The sound of jazz pouring out from a nightclub in the French Quarter… the smell of shrimp boiling in a spicy gumbo… the fresh feeling you get after you’ve cleaned between your teeth with dental floss?

You may not know it, but besides its culinary charms and musical mojo, New Orleans has another claim to fame: It’s the historical home of dental floss. In the early 1800’s, a pioneering dentist by the name of Dr. Levi Spear Parmly recommended that his patients clean between their teeth with a silken thread. Long before the role of oral bacteria was recognized, it was Dr. Parmly’s belief that cavities were caused by foreign material on the tooth surfaces. But it took until nearly the end of the century for his invention to become available in handy dispensers. And the rest, as they say, is history.

Today, of course, we know much more about the causes and treatment of tooth decay. For example, we know that harmful bacteria in plaque — the sticky biofilm that builds up on your teeth in the absence of effective cleaning — release chemical substances that erode tooth enamel; this causes cavities (tiny holes in the tooth) to begin forming. We also know that while brushing alone helps remove plaque, it’s far and away more effective when combined with flossing.

Yet there’s one thing we’re still not sure of: Why don’t more people use dental floss regularly? Did you know that with careful attention to your oral hygiene, tooth decay is almost completely preventable? Plus, dental floss is now available in many different varieties: It’s no longer made of silk, but can consist of nylon or gore-tex thread; it comes waxed or unwaxed, round or flat… even flavored like mint or bubble gum!

So here’s our suggestion: Find a style of dental floss you like, picture yourself on Bourbon Street… and spend a few minutes flossing every day. Your teeth will say “merci beaucoup.”

If you would like more information about flossing and cavity prevention, please call our office to schedule a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Tooth Decay.”